Saint Theresa Parish

A Roman Catholic Community
5045 E. Thomas Road
Phoenix, AZ 85018
(602) 840-0850 Parish Office
(602) 840-0871 Parish Fax  

Parish Email info@sttheresaphx.org

Parish Office Hours
Monday through Thursday
9:00AM-Noon & 1:00PM-5:00PM
Friday 9:00AM-12noon         Sunday 8:30AM-12:30PM

Closed Saturdays
& most Federal Holidays.

Liturgy Schedule
Saturday Vigil Mass 4PM
Sunday Masses
7:30AM
9:00AM (Liturgy with Children)
11:00AM and
5:00PM (Teen and Young Adult)

Daily Masses
Monday through Friday
6:30AM and Saturday at 8:00AM
Holy Day Masses as announced in bulletin prior to the Holy Day.

Sacrament of Reconciliation
(Confession)
Saturday, 9:00AM to 10:00AM
Wednesday, 5:00PM to 6:00PM and by appointment

Pastor

Rev. Charles G. Kieffer

Parochial Vicar 

(Associate Pastor)

Rev. Joachim Adeyemi

Rev. J.C. Ortiz

Priest in Residence

Rev. Kevin Grimditch

Assisting Priest

Rev. Paul Peri

Deacons

Colin F. Campbell

Mark Kriese

Ralph Ulibarri

 

Saint Theresa Catholic School
5001 East Thomas Road
Phoenix, AZ 85018

www.stcs.us

(602) 840-0010 School Office
(602) 840-8323 School Fax

 

 

Administration
Friday
Aug182017

Reflections - August 20, 2017

My Brothers and Sisters,

Last week, it was my pleasure to introduce to you – via this column – our new Principal of St. Theresa Catholic School, Dr. Thomas Dertinger.

Today, I have another introduction… José Reyes has joined our Parish Staff as Coordinator of Evangelization. Some of you have already met José, as he has been present for a number of parish and school events since beginning his ministry at the beginning of this month.

José’s presence on our staff is quite a gift to us, in more ways than one. Among other things, he decided to set aside a year to focus on ministry as a part of his ongoing discernment of a potential vocation to the priesthood. His ministry this year is his gift to the Church; the parish is providing room and board in the rectory for José and is covering his medical insurance costs – but otherwise he is taking no salary, volunteering this time of service to our parish community.

José has practiced as a civil engineer since graduating from Arizona State University in 2012. As an engineer, he spent a majority of his time constructing and maintaining dams around the Flagstaff and Phoenix areas. During the middle of his engineering career, José became a FOCUS missionary (college campus minister) in the bible belt of Oklahoma where Catholics only represented 4% of the religious population.

During the time he spent with FOCUS (Fellowship of Catholic University Students), José formed students to become spiritual leaders in their academic, social and physical lives. José led more than 150 men from all walks of life in small group bible studies and was blessed to train more than 25 men in one-on-one discipleship programs that provided them with tools to lead their own bible studies and form their own disciples (the normal protocol of FOCUS is to have men working with male students, women with female students). Foreign mission trips quickly became a special focus for José, as he had dedicated his life to Jesus Christ in college during a FOCUS mission trip in Togo, Africa. On these mission trips, José had the opportunity to bring men and women to Mexico, the Dominican Republic and Jamaica.

After his service with FOCUS, José returned to Phoenix (his hometown) as an engineer. I had the privilege of coming to know José while serving as his confessor; after 2 years, it was clear to José that his heart was calling him to come back into a life of full-time ministry... with an openness to the possibility of eventually becoming a priest. José hopes to bring his experiences as a FOCUS alumnus to St. Theresa Parish and School in order to “form disciples to form disciples” in our own back yard. 

Plans are coming together for José to offer the men and women of our community various discipleship formation opportunities and groups, to potentially begin a men’s ministry, to offer adult spiritual and faith formation options, activities for young adults and young Catholic professionals, as well as working on outreach and evangelization opportunities in conjunction with Fr. JC and other staff members. Stay tuned for further news about what’s in store for the coming year! I know that you’ll help José feel welcome in the St. Theresa Community.

 

Grace and peace in Christ,

Rev. Charles G. Kieffer

Pastor

 

Monday
Aug142017

Reflections - August 13, 2017

My Brothers and Sisters,

It’s hard to believe that summer is over (at least for those of us who are tuned into the academic year!) and that a new school year is underway here at St. Theresa!  New and returning students began their classes at our parish school this past week, our school families are coming to know one another and once again we are with a highly-qualified and wonderful faculty at St. Theresa Catholic School.

Particularly exciting is the fact that we are blest with a new Principal, Dr. Thomas Dertinger, who joined our staff in June and has been hard at work – along with faculty and parent volunteers – laying the foundation for an exciting and successful school year for our students.

Dr. Dertinger comes to us having served for the past 13 years as Principal of St. Mary's Catholic School in Richmond, Virginia. He and his wife Barbara relocated to Arizona in May to be closer to their daughter who recently moved to the Valley. 

Dr. Dertinger has a deep and clear commitment to Catholic education as well as parish life - understanding that a Catholic school is at its best when all school activities are integrated into Catholic identity.  He views instructional leadership as creating an environment in which teachers are supported and motivated to convey information and an enthusiasm for learning that is passed on to students; in the environment of the Catholic school, teachers are asked to focus on Gospel values while maintaining academic rigor in the classroom. 

In addition to holding a Doctorate in Education (focusing on Curriculum, Instruction and Supervision) from the State University of New York, Dr. Dertinger holds a Master of Science degree (also from SUNY) and a Master of Business Administration granted by the University of Richmond (Virginia). He's certified as a K-12 School Superintendent and K-8 Principal for the State of Virginia as well as a certification in 9-12 Mathematics for the State of New York. His parish involvements include serving as an Extraordinary Minister of Holy Communion, as a member of the Parish Baptism Team and as a facilitator for the Virtus Child Abuse Awareness Program (the Diocese of Richmond's version of our Safe Environment Training Program). He is credentialed as a catechist as prescribed by the Handing on the Faith program of the Diocese of Richmond.

The consensus of the Interview Team (hiring committee comprised of a cross section of parishioners, staff, involved school parents and a representative of the Diocesan Catholic Schools Office) was that Dr. Dertinger is an "excellent fit" to serve as our Principal; already he is feeling at home in his ministry as Principal with us and is working to establish effective communication and positive relationships at St. Theresa Parish and School.

As we begin the 2017-18 school year at St. Theresa, please continue to pray that all faculty and staff members of our parish school – as well as the catechists who pass on the faith to our young people who attend public, private and public charter schools – allow the Holy Spirit to form them as instruments of God’s love and witnesses of Christ’s Gospel in the lives of the children of our community.

 

Blessings and peace,

Rev. Charles G. Kieffer

Pastor

 

Thursday
Aug032017

August 6, 2017

It’s the Most Wonderful Time of the Year!

   St. Theresa Catholic School starts this week for another academic year. There have been some members of our parish have been getting ready for this opening event all summer. Clothes, shoes, school supplies of varying kinds were purchased. New Principal, new  teachers, new schedules, new faces will have to be learned (prime opportunity for some Evangelization…).

  Moms and Dads will leave  their little darlings off as they hand their care over to others. Some children will be left off with sighs of relief. Some children will have a photograph while other children will make a video. There will be a few tears from some children and parents alike. Other veteran parents will just smile. First year college students are stopping by the parish just to share with us, that they will be off to their universities in a few days. They have already started corresponding with their soon-to-be roommates so as to see who would bring the mini-fridge and who will bring the microwave. Of course there should be no duplicate CDs as space is at a premium. The anticipation is almost freighting. Lots of anticipation and excitement on the parts of most. Every day contains excitement and anticipation if we but look and see how blessed and graced we are. Then we invite others into our blessed and graced lives. That is Evangelization “on the hoof”. Every day is a new start with all kinds of adventures. All of us, like this year’s parents and students, have opportunity to get started again. Just like those students who ran off to dive right into the adventure, we are called to jump into this gift of life with all we have and invite others into our lives. Remember that is what evangelization is at the core. Inviting others into our grace filled lives. We are called to proclaim the Good News of Jesus with joy and excitement: to evangelize! We have been given a mission. We have the mission of helping in the gathering of all to experience the great and powerful love of God. There were a few students who hung back clinging to the familiar. Those students were wanting to stay with mom or dad. We know that there are those in our own community who want the safety of clinging to the old and the familiar. However we are called, like that wise second grader who with love took the hand of her sister and gently led her away from mom to something new. We are to lead with compassion, others who might need more support to “new life”. This new life is the life of salvation won for the baptised by the suffering, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ - the Paschal Mystery. Out of love in faithfulness to the Father’s will, our Savior procured for us everlasting life! We do indeed have much to be excited about, and we must share this with others. We are called to embrace and live his way through evangelization. It is a great time of year to Evangelize.  It’s a wonderful time of year.  WE go out and Evangelize.

~Fr. JC

 

Thursday
Aug032017

Reflections - July 30, 2017

THE ART OF LIVING
Do you recall last week’s “Pastor’s Note”? It was about being KIND. I suggested that, “Our lives would be more attractive to others when we are KIND. That is one of the components to Evangelization. To live lives that are at-tractive to others. To evangelize is to be KIND.” I don’t know about you, but I am almost sure that most of us are attracted to kind people. After all, the kindness they exude is contagious. There it is once again, as plain as the nose on my face, simple, direct and obvious. EVANGELIZATION is living well, which embodies being kind. It is not something hard to achieve. It is as simple and as direct and as obvious as realizing that all it takes to be gracious is to be kind. All it takes to Evangelize is to live attractive inviting lives. Pope Emertius Benedict XVI even wrote that living well is the path toward happiness. “To evangelize means to show this path - to teach the art of living,” he says. The retired pope goes on to say that Evangelization entails more than proclaiming doctrines and moral truths. More fundamentally it is teaching what he calls, “the art of living.” For hundreds of years, men and women learned the art of living from a predominately Judeo-Christian culture that handed on the wisdom of how to live a happy life from one generation to the next. Perhaps as society has forgotten the way to be gracious, we have forgot-ten how to live happy lives. “The deepest [human] poverty is the inability of joy, the tediousness of a life consid-ered absurd and contradictory. This poverty is widespread today, in very different forms in the materially rich as well as the poor countries. The inability of joy presupposes and produces the inability to love, produces jealousy, avarice - all defects that devastate the life of individuals and of the world. This is why we are in need of a new evangelization - if the art of living remains an unknown, nothing else works.” Our de-Christianized, relativistic, “anything goes” society has cut itself off from this tradition. Benedict was concerned that the essential values to live a happy life are no longer being passed on. Young people might learn how to succeed in a job, but they aren’t trained in the basics of how to build a successful marriage. We might learn how to invest our money wisely, but we’re unsure how to raise our children in the faith. Benedict XVI said that our relationships are stunted by the ina-bility to possess joy and love. The former pope goes to say that there is hope, “There are Christians who drop out of this strange consensus of modern existence, who attempt new forms of life.” In Salt and Light, he says, “To be sure, they don’t receive any public notice, but they are doing something that really points to the future.”
For the Holy Father the New Evangelization will be carried out in a particular way through new movements, in-dividuals, families and other small Christian communities who eventually transforms the culture. In other words, it takes place through those of us who dare to show - with our lives - this hope and joy the world has forgotten simply by living lives that attract others and inviting them into our joy. This new Evangelization being talked about by Pope Francis is nothing new at all. Benedict wrote about it. St. Pope John Paul II spoke about it. Pope Francis preaches it. Countless men and women down through the centuries have lived it. To evangelize means to show this path - to teach the art of living; to be kind to each other. This means that everyone, the whole parish is the Evange-lization Committee, the entire parish becomes the Evangelization Team. All of us, the members of this Saint The-resa Faith community are aware and on the lookout for those in our neighbourhoods, our schools, at sporting events, the pool, at a barbecue who have been away from a community that cares. They have been away from the Church. We simple “invest” in these relationships (when the appropriate time and opportunity arises) to kindly invite them into our lives, our communities, back into the Church. The new Evangelization strategy is all of our responsibility. I realize that it may be difficult to invite someone back to church. It is initially easier to invite some-one to a Wine Tasting put on by the Knights of Columbus, a Baseball Game on the beautiful school fields, a Len-ten DVD presentation, the new Drips & Digs Gardening group, singing in the choir, a backyard barbeque or any of the countless opportunities that exist here and in our neighbourhoods. This KIND and simple invitation is part of The Art Of Living well and basically our baptismal call: To reach out to others, kindly inviting them into lives that reflect love, joy and hope. It is the ART OF LIVING.
~Fr. JC

Do you recall last week’s “Pastor’s Note”? It was about being KIND. I suggested that, “Our lives would be more attractive to others when we are KIND. That is one of the components to Evangelization. To live lives that are at-tractive to others. To evangelize is to be KIND.” I don’t know about you, but I am almost sure that most of us are attracted to kind people. After all, the kindness they exude is contagious. There it is once again, as plain as the nose on my face, simple, direct and obvious. EVANGELIZATION is living well, which embodies being kind. It is not something hard to achieve. It is as simple and as direct and as obvious as realizing that all it takes to be gracious is to be kind. All it takes to Evangelize is to live attractive inviting lives. Pope Emertius Benedict XVI even wrote that living well is the path toward happiness. “To evangelize means to show this path - to teach the art of living,” he says. The retired pope goes on to say that Evangelization entails more than proclaiming doctrines and moral truths. More fundamentally it is teaching what he calls, “the art of living.” For hundreds of years, men and women learned the art of living from a predominately Judeo-Christian culture that handed on the wisdom of how to live a happy life from one generation to the next. Perhaps as society has forgotten the way to be gracious, we have forgot-ten how to live happy lives. “The deepest [human] poverty is the inability of joy, the tediousness of a life consid-ered absurd and contradictory. This poverty is widespread today, in very different forms in the materially rich as well as the poor countries. The inability of joy presupposes and produces the inability to love, produces jealousy, avarice - all defects that devastate the life of individuals and of the world. This is why we are in need of a new evangelization - if the art of living remains an unknown, nothing else works.” Our de-Christianized, relativistic, “anything goes” society has cut itself off from this tradition. Benedict was concerned that the essential values to live a happy life are no longer being passed on. Young people might learn how to succeed in a job, but they aren’t trained in the basics of how to build a successful marriage. We might learn how to invest our money wisely, but we’re unsure how to raise our children in the faith. Benedict XVI said that our relationships are stunted by the ina-bility to possess joy and love. The former pope goes to say that there is hope, “There are Christians who drop out of this strange consensus of modern existence, who attempt new forms of life.” In Salt and Light, he says, “To be sure, they don’t receive any public notice, but they are doing something that really points to the future.”For the Holy Father the New Evangelization will be carried out in a particular way through new movements, in-dividuals, families and other small Christian communities who eventually transforms the culture. In other words, it takes place through those of us who dare to show - with our lives - this hope and joy the world has forgotten simply by living lives that attract others and inviting them into our joy. This new Evangelization being talked about by Pope Francis is nothing new at all. Benedict wrote about it. St. Pope John Paul II spoke about it. Pope Francis preaches it. Countless men and women down through the centuries have lived it. To evangelize means to show this path - to teach the art of living; to be kind to each other. This means that everyone, the whole parish is the Evange-lization Committee, the entire parish becomes the Evangelization Team. All of us, the members of this Saint The-resa Faith community are aware and on the lookout for those in our neighbourhoods, our schools, at sporting events, the pool, at a barbecue who have been away from a community that cares. They have been away from the Church. We simple “invest” in these relationships (when the appropriate time and opportunity arises) to kindly invite them into our lives, our communities, back into the Church. The new Evangelization strategy is all of our responsibility. I realize that it may be difficult to invite someone back to church. It is initially easier to invite some-one to a Wine Tasting put on by the Knights of Columbus, a Baseball Game on the beautiful school fields, a Len-ten DVD presentation, the new Drips & Digs Gardening group, singing in the choir, a backyard barbeque or any of the countless opportunities that exist here and in our neighbourhoods. This KIND and simple invitation is part of The Art Of Living well and basically our baptismal call: To reach out to others, kindly inviting them into lives that reflect love, joy and hope. It is the ART OF LIVING.~Fr. JC

Friday
Jul212017

Reflections - July 23, 2017

JUST BE KIND

A week or so ago when I was scheduled for the “Midnight Mass” (the 6:30 a.m. weekday Liturgy), I began to read through all of the readings for the upcoming week that Sunday afternoon.  Yet, I found myself still pondering the Sunday readings for that Fourteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time. The Psalm especially for that weekend had called for disciples to be gracious , merciful, and compassionate.  I was stuck at gracious. Just what is/was gracious? I hadn’t heard that word used since my mother had said that, “one of her friends was a gracious person and to act accordingly when we visited”. Indeed, as I looked up gracious, there happened to be a chart on the web site that I visited showing the frequency of the use of the various words. Gracious was used frequently in the 1800s but the chart showed that the word gracious almost “flat-lined” by 2010. Did this mean that we moderns stopped using the word? Did modern Americans, like myself, stop using the word because we had no idea of what it meant to be gracious? Had social media taken it’s toll on graciousness with the lack of opportunity to actually be social? I mean, that we have all experienced to some degree, either by watching or participating, the act of being in the same spot with another person and actually texting one another and not engaging in actual conversation. I must confess. I have been on car trips and instead of talking, I have asked questions, sent quips, photographs, cute sayings, etc. via text while people were less than a foot away. Mea culpa! I don’t think that was gracious. Well, I had the perfect opportunity with the upcoming weekly homilies to investigate not only gracious, but merciful and compassionate as well. The readings for that week actually lent themselves to this task quite well. That Monday I explained my dilemma and with the collective wisdom of the “Early Birds” we set out to find out what the scriptures were asking of us. Several early morning Mass attendees came up to me after Liturgy and gave me examples and situations where someone had acted in a gracious manner. Well, at least I knew that they were listening. Some of the synonyms for gracious were, among many, considerate, courteous, polite, thoughtful, kind. In Christian belief and usage, gracious meant showing divine grace. Alright, we were getting somewhere. Parishioners kept giving me their own definitions such as “joyful giving” as an attempt to better understand. So, we tackled merciful and compassionate in the same manner. It was quite easy to begin to get a handle on these words or give examples of when someone was gracious or merciful or compassionate. However what seemed to be lacking was making these words, these attributes  part of our individual lives. We knew when someone was gracious, or merciful, or compassionate but how did we become gracious, merciful, or compassionate? Is not Liturgy meant to change us, transform us, converts us? How does this work in our own lives? We (I needed!) agreed we needed some simple act or advice or a constructive way to become more of what the Scriptures were asking us to become. I needed a visual reminder! A chart, I needed a chart. I looked at all of the words again. I looked at their definitions. I looked at their synonyms again. These words were used to define the other. Merciful was used to define gracious. Compassionate was part of being merciful. Gracious was the act of being compassionate with others… Then it jumped out! There it was obviously present. The one word that was used to help in defining the other three words-KIND! To be gracious was to be KIND. To be merciful was to be KIND. To be compassionate was to be kind. KIND. Simple, direct, easy, and obvious; all we had to be was KIND! In being KIND, one was on the road to being gracious, to being merciful, to being compassionate. Our lives would be more attractive to others when we are KIND. That is one of the components to Evangelization. To live lives that are attractive to others. To evangelize is to be KIND. That week we heard in Scripture that The mission of Jesus is authenticated. (by being KIND)  Jesus prayed to send (KIND) laborers for the harvest.  Jesus chooses and sent (KIND) disciples to proclaim the reign of God. We are called to share God’s love as gift (KINDly). When one encounters opposition and even persecution, return it with KINDness.

There it was! 

JUST BE KIND.  JUST BE KIND.  JUST BE KIND

Love and KINDness,

Fr. JC